United States Chart Suite: Federal Organisation, Defence Organisation And Defence Industry

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Secretary of State John Kerry, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, Japan Minister of Foreign Affairs Fumio Kishida, and Minister of Defense Itsunori Onodera signed the Protocol Amending the Agreement between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of Japan Concerning the Implementation of the Relocation of III Marine Expeditionary Force Personnel and Their Dependents from Okinawa to Guam. The “Guam International Agreement” (GIA) was signed in 2009, implementing a key aspect of the 2006 realignment roadmap by providing a framework for reducing the footprint of the U.S. military presence in Okinawa, while still maintaining operational capability and a credible deterrent. The planned relocation, which is due to begin in the early 2020s, is an essential element of a strategic realignment to achieve a geographically distributed, operationally resilient, and politically sustainable military presence in Japan. In April 2012 , the United States and Japan decided to adjust the terms of the 2006 realignment roadmap by delinking the relocation from progress on the Futenma Replacement Facility and reducing the number of Marines relocating to Guam from approximately 8,000 (with significant numbers of family members) to approximately 5,000 (mostly rotational/without family members), while maintaining the overall reduction in the U.S. Marine Corps presence on Okinawa through additional relocations to Hawaii and rotations to Australia. The Protocol amending the GIA reflects these changes. Additional changes include: * Clarifying that Japan will contribute up to 3.1 billion in Fiscal Year 2012 U.S. dollars in direct cash contributions to develop facilities and infrastructure in Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.(The 2012 Security Consultative Committee Joint Statement estimated the total cost of the Guam relocation to be 8.6 billion.) * Affirming that the Government of the United States of America, with the intent to provide reasonable access, shall favorably consider requests by the Government of Japan to use training areas in Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. ((M2 Communications disclaims all liability for information provided within M2 PressWIRE. Data supplied by named party/parties. Further information on M2 PressWIRE can be obtained at http://www.presswire.com on the world wide web. Inquiries to info@m2.com. (C)1994-2013 M2 COMMUNICATIONS

Actually, the United States Has Defaulted

The Federal Organization Charts are fastest and easiest way for you to find your way through the complex maze of the Federal government. Over 280 uniform fold-out organization charts graphically show you who’s who and where in more than 2,100 departments and offices. Reach over 15,000 key decision-makers who award defense contracts in military departments, including the key offices, commands, agencies, and laboratories involved in RDT&E and procurement with Defense Organization Charts. Carroll Publishing’s Defense Industry Charts product puts you in direct contact with nearly 7,300 key personnel in more than 100 top U.S. defense contractors – including major aerospace, electronic, military hardware, information technology and systems integration companies. For more information visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/3kjtnn/united_states CONTACT: Research and Markets, Laura Wood, Senior Manager. press@researchandmarkets.com Fax from USA: 646-607-1907 Fax from rest of the world: +353-1-481-1716 Sector: Government ( http://www.researchandmarkets.com/categories.asp?cat_id=79&campaign_id=3kjtnn), Homeland Defence ( http://www.researchandmarkets.com/categories.asp?cat_id=138&campaign_id=3kjtnn ) ((M2 Communications disclaims all liability for information provided within M2 PressWIRE. Data supplied by named party/parties. Further information on M2 PressWIRE can be obtained at http://www.presswire.com on the world wide web. Inquiries to info@m2.com)). (c) 2013 M2 COMMUNICATIONS

Treasury could not make its payments on maturing securities to individual investors. The Treasury was also late in redeeming T-bills which become due on May 3 and May 10, 1979. The Treasury blamed this delay on an unprecedented volume of participation by small investors, on failure of Congress to act in a timely fashion on the debt ceiling legislation in April, and on an unanticipated failure of word processing equipment used to prepare check schedules. The United States thus defaulted because Treasurys back office was on the fritz in the wake of a debt limit showdown. This default was temporary. Treasury did pay these T-bills after a short delay. But it balked at paying additional interest to cover the period of delay. According to Zivney and Marcus, it required both legal arm twisting and new legislation before Treasury made all investors whole for that additional interest. The United States thus did default once. It was small. It was unintentional. But it was indeed a default. And the nation still stands. But that hardly means we should run the experiment again and at larger scale.